Overcoming Isolation: How to Enjoy Alone Time Caused by Chronic Illness

Chronic illness is isolating. Spending hours alone every day can be lonely. Here’s what I have learned about embracing solitude and learning to be comfortable in my own company.

Overcoming Isolation: How To Enjoy Alone Time Caused by Chronic Illness

I recently went out for lunch with friend who had just transitioned from her office to working from home. She described dreading the long hours on her own, and the resulting cabin fever of spending so much time in one place. As I listened, I realized what a significant transformation my own feelings about solitude have undergone during my illness experience.

As an extrovert, I’ve never looked forward to spending an entire day by myself – never mind a succession of days. I prefer to be around people. I’m happier spending an afternoon in a café than my living room. When chronic pain forced me out of grad school, I was at a loss of what to do with myself at home all day.

But I think it’s about more than being an introvert versus an extrovert. Looking back, I don’t think I ever distinguished between loneliness and solitude. I wasn’t comfortable with my own company. As I reflected on what I have learned about embracing solitude, I came to a few conclusions about the lessons my experience has taught me and what I’m still working on.

Being Present For Simple Pleasures

The first step on my path towards becoming a reformed extrovert was learning to value being present. A year or two after being diagnosed with fibromyalgia and endometriosis, I was referred to a Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction course at my hospital – an eight week program on using mindfulness meditation to manage pain. I often credit mindfulness meditation for maintaining my sanity, but one of the most important lessons that I’ve learned is that there are many enjoyable moments in ordinary life that can enrich our lives if only we pay attention in the present moment. The sun on your face, bird song out the window, a great cup of coffee, or a snuggle with your pet are all examples of simple, everyday pleasures that are available for us to enjoy if we learn to tune in to the present moment. Being on autopilot most of the time meant that I was oblivious to these experiences. It’s often easier to savor these times on your own rather than in company, and that’s one of the reasons I have come to value my alone time.

Exploring New Horizons (From Home)

A second change in my perspective has come from exploring my interests and finding new hobbies. In other words, unleashing my inner geek. From reading, and watching and listening, I’ve discovered that I love historical murder mystery books, political news, blogging, archaeology documentaries and calligraphy. I feel fortunate to live in an era of podcasts, online libraries, free e-courses, audiobooks and streaming. If your illness keeps you at home much of the time, being able to explore new horizons from your couch is fantastic. Whether or not you are crafty, artistic, musical or nerdy, there’s something out there for you to geek out on. I honestly haven’t found anything else I prefer to do on my own as much as to feed my curiosity. In the process, I have learned about myself. Learning more about the world helps you understand your own place in it better. Discovering new interests, and new talents is deeply rewarding. Spending time that way really transforms loneliness to solitude.

Making Time For Meaningful Self-Care

Finally, seeing the dividends of investing in self-care has made me more open to making time for myself. This isn’t an easy thing to do. You often see advice about self-care made out to seem like it’s as simple as lighting some candles and taking a bath now and then. I think it’s really about changing your relationship with yourself. Who wants to spend time with someone they don’t like very much? No one. If you have an inner critic with a megaphone, of course you don’t want to spend alone time together. The prospect of spending time by myself months that I was always looking for another distraction. In the age of scrolling through social media and binge watching TV, I think enjoying me-time is almost a lost art form (not that I like binge watching any less than the next person!).

It takes a change in mindset to identify negative self-talk, challenge it and replace it with a kinder and gentler perception of yourself. Self-care is really about self-compassion, and accepting that you’re only human, just like everyone else – it’s okay to be imperfect and make mistakes. For many people  there is a lot of worry, guilt, frustration and self-blame tied up in developing a chronic illness. Cultivating self-compassion in the face of difficult circumstances is a long process, and I’ve found that many lessons need to be re-learned over time. Journaling, meditating, CBT, and therapy are all ways to improve your relationship with yourself. Learning to be more comfortable in my own skin has made me enjoy my own company much more than before. And now I’m much more likely to enjoy a quiet cup of tea, listen to music, meditate, or actually do any of the self-care activities by myself that are listed in the lifestyle magazines!

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Acceptance, Grief & Chronic Illness: The Top 4 Ways I Learned to Cope After my Diagnosis

Acceptance Grief and Chronic Illness:THE TOP 4 WAYS I LEARNED TO COPE AFTER MY DIAGNOSISYou probably vividly remember that moment when you sat in a doctor’s office and were told that the explanation for all your confusing symptoms was summed up in a word: fibromyalgia. For some of you, this diagnosis was the first chronic condition you were diagnosed with. For others, it was the second. And for those who had already been diagnosed with multiple chronic illnesses, this one was just another to add to the collection. The reality is that fibromyalgia is one of ten conditions the National Institutes of Health recently labelled Chronic Overlapping Pain Conditions (COPCs ).[1] These include chronic migraine and headache, interstitial cystitis, vulvodynia, IBS, low back pain, endometriosis, TMJ disorders, and chronic fatigue syndrome,  In addition, fibromyalgia is commonly diagnosed alongside autoimmune and inflammatory conditions, like rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.[2]  Finally, anxiety and depression are much more likely to be co-morbid (found simultaneously) in people living with fibromyalgia.[3]  Many fibromyalgia patients will have the déjà-vu experience of sitting in a doctor’s office and being diagnosed with yet another chronic illness.

I recently relived that experience myself. I sat in my OB-GYN’s office and was told that a recent laparoscopy confirmed that I have endometriosis alongside my fibromyalgia. I told myself that after years of dealing with chronic pain, this was no big deal – same problem, different location. All I needed to do was learn what my treatment options were and then go home and use the self-care skills I have developed over the years to manage my pain. A few days later, while I was examining my incision scars, I broke down in tears. “Get a grip,” I told myself, “this is nothing new“. But as the pelvic pain returned, despite the laparoscopy, and I confronted the reality of dealing with another hard-to-manage chronic illness,  I had to acknowledge my feelings of anger and sadness over this new diagnosis. Intellectually I know that being diagnosed with endometriosis will not change my life as dramatically as my fibromyalgia diagnosis did. I’ve already had to leave my career because of my disabling fibro symptoms. Instead, I stay at home pursuing hobbies, like writing and calligraphy, while I look after my health.

So I wondered, why is this second diagnosis affecting me so much?  To answer this question, I needed to remember what I experienced after my first diagnosis.  As anyone who has had a significant diagnosis knows, you go through a period of grieving afterwards. Grief is the “primary emotional process of reacting to… loss” (Absenger, 2015).[4]  The stages of grief after a diagnosis include: numbness-disbelief, separation distress, depression-mourning, and recovery.[5] While there are similarities to the stages of grief that people generally experience after any loss, the grieving process for people diagnosed with a chronic illness has unique characteristics.  In an article for social workers helping clients with chronic illness, Kate Jackson (2014) explains the difference:

Most often, grief is a reaction to a single, time-limited event… Grief associated with chronic illness, however, is more complex for many individuals.  For people who are chronically ill, the losses are multiple and permanent and therefore difficult to resolve. Because these losses are unending, they’re known as infinite losses.

The scope of losses due to chronic illness are broad and complex, and they can change during the course of an illness.  The loss of health and ability can, in turn, cause losses in a person’s career, social life, sexual function, body image, relationships, parenting ability  and daily functioning, among other areas.  Most fundamentally, these secondary losses caused by chronic illness can fracture self-identity and diminish self-esteem.  The fact that many people with chronic illness feel that their experiences are invalidated by stigma and disbelief can further their sense of isolation.

The concept of infinite losses helped me to understand why a second diagnosis brought up so many difficult emotions. I have had to acknowledge that the grieving process over one, or multiple, illnesses is not a ‘one and done’ kind of thing. Grief comes in waves. If your illness changes, or you develop a new illness, your emotional response will also change because, correspondingly, the losses you experience are new and different. Prior to the pelvic pain that led to my laparoscopy, my fibromyalgia symptoms had stabilized and I had reached a state of acceptance about my illness. I wanted to believe this was a permanent state. I resisted the idea that a new condition would cause me to grieve again (because who wants to go through that once more?). However, I have come to recognize that the losses caused by endometriosis in my life are significantly different than those caused by fibromyalgia.  For me, endometriosis is entangled with my desire to start a family and be a mother, my body image and my sense of femininity. In contrast, fibromyalgia has primarily affected my career aspirations and the part of my identity that was defined by my professional accomplishments.

Once I acknowledged that I was grieving over my second diagnosis, I felt a greater sense of peace.  Resisting these feelings consumed a lot of my energy and effort. Jackson (2014) explains that “people with unresolved grief may experience more profound and difficult-to-treat depression and anxiety”.  Furthermore, the symptoms of a chronic illness can be worsened by unacknowledged grief, including pain, fatigue and cognition.  As people living with chronic illness, I think it’s important that we be on the lookout for experiencing grief when we develop a new illness, or a change in a current illness.  Understanding that grief and acceptance are fluid states can help us be more open to acknowledging grief.  It’s important to seek out support and help once you recognize these feelings. Here are a few tools and resources for coping with grief about your chronic illness, based on what has helped me:

  • Mindfulness meditation: “Mindfulness is awareness that arises through paying attention, on purpose, in the present moment, non-judgmentally,” according to Jon Kabat-Zinn, a pioneer of mindfulness in medicine. The Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program created by Jon Kabat-Zinn to teach mindfulness to patients had demonstrated remarkable benefits for reducing chronic pain as well as anxiety and depression in fibromyalgia.[6] You can find an MBSR program in your community, or there is a free version online http://palousemindfulness.com/. Alternatively, you can learn meditation using a free app on your phone. Two of my favourites include the Insight Timer and The Meaning of Life Experiment. You can practice mindfulness through meditation, body scans, mindful eating, or mindful movement like yoga or Tai Chi.
  • Cognitive Behavioural Therapy: Studies have found that participating in CBT can help reduce pain, depressive thoughts, and improve quality of life for people with chronic pain.[7] One of the core parts of the program is learning to identify negative thinking traps, or ‘cognitive distortions’.  These are thoughts that “sound rational and accurate, but really only serve to keep us feeling bad about ourselves” (Grohol, 2016).[8] These programs also focus on helpful behaviour changes like learning deep relaxation as well as pacing activities. CBT programs are run in most communities and your doctor should be able to refer you to one.
  • Find a support group, whether in person or online. It can be incredibly powerful to know that you are not alone in facing the challenges caused by your chronic illness. There are private facebook groups for every condition, where you can find support and people with shared experiences. The #spoonie hashtag can help you find other people with chronic illness on twitter. If you are able to, an in-person support group can be an important source of connection if you are struggling. No matter how much support your family and friends can provide, it can help to talk with people who have the same condition(s) you do.
  • Talk with a professional therapist: Unresolved grief is a difficult issue to work through. Many people benefit from talking with an experienced therapist, one-on-one. My advice is to find a counsellor with experience in working with clients who have chronic illness- your specialist may be able to refer you. It’s critical that you ascertain that the therapist validates the existence of your chronic illness and does not tell clients that the illness ‘is all in their head’. Think of the first appointment as an interview, where you see if you are compatible and ask about their professional experience. You may wish to learn more about the therapeutic approaches used by different therapists prior to choosing one. For example, I found that the empathetic, strengths-based counselling provided by a social worker fit much better with my personality than the objective, analytical technique used by a psychiatrist.

Acceptance Grief and Chronic Illness

[1]http://www.overlappingconditions.org/About_COPCs

[2] http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025619615002438

[3] https://www.verywell.com/fibromyalgia-comorbid-overlapping-conditions-716184

[4] Absenger, W. (2015). Mindfulness and the Stages of Grief in Chronic Disease. ACEF. Retrieved 15 April 2017 from http://amacf.org/mindfulness-stages-of-grief-in-chronic-disease/

[5] National Cancer Institute. (2014, October 8). PDQ® grief, bereavement, and coping with loss. National Cancer Institute. Retrieved 15 April 2017 from http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/supportivecare/bereavement/patient

[6] Paul Grossman, Ulrike Gilmer, Annette Raysz and Ulrike Kesper. 2007. Mindfulness Training as an Intervention for Fibromyalgia: Evidence of Postintervention and 3-Year Follow-up Benefits in Well-being. Psychology and Psychosomatics 76: 226-233

[7] Holmes, A., Christelis, N., and Arnold, C. (2012). Depression and chronic pain. MJA Open Suppl (4):17-20.

[8] Grohol, J. (2016). 15 Common Cognitive Distortions. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 15, 2016, from http://psychcentral.com/lib/15-common-cognitive-distortions/